Munich School of BioEngineering

The Munich School of BioEngineering (MSB) is an interdisciplinary research center within the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in Germany.


Research

At the MSB, researchers specializing in medicine, the natural sciences, and engineering join forces to develop new methods for diagnosing or treating diseases and improved technologies that compensate for physical disabilities. The activities cover the whole development process – beginning with the study of basic scientific principles and ending with their application in new medical devices, medicines, and software programs. Read more


Study

On both the Master's and the doctoral level, the MSB provides a variety of options for an interdisciplinary education in bioengineering, biomedical engineering, medical physics, medical informatics and related fields. More information is available on the page of the master's program “Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics“ as well as on the overview pages for the master's programs and doctoral studies.


Entrepreneurship

The MSB actively supports researchers who want to start a business and turn their findings into innovative products and services. Read more


News

  • Lined on the inside with virus-binding molecules, nano shells made of DNA material bind viruses tightly and thus render them harmless. Image: Elena-Marie Willner / DietzLab

    The virus trap

    15 July 2021 | To date, there are no effective antidotes against most virus infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method. 

  • First author Benedikt Buchmann at the microscope. Through time-resolved observation of the cells, the research team was able to investigate the interactions between the organoid cells and the surrounding collagen in detail. Image: M. Kratzer / TUM

    Mechanical stimuli influence organ growth

    13 July 2021 | In addition to chemical factors, mechanical influences play an important role in the natural growth of human organs – but also in the development of tumors. Now a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated the process in detail using organoids, three-dimensional model systems of organs which are produced in the laboratory.